Dee Dee’s Morning

It’s clear that Dylan and Dora have fun each morning at the dog park. Dee Dee has her own special morning as well.

Dee Dee and Mom set off early to miss the heat and make a 1.5+ mile loop through the beautiful neighborhood.

The streets are canopied by massive old oak and cedar trees covered in Spanish moss. Magnolias and palms are interspersed. It’s a beautiful walk. We see squirrels and Dee Dee’s nemesis, two black cats, and even an occasional deer.

It’s a special time each morning leaving Dee Dee tired and happy. Mom too.

Escape to Alaska

On June 26, the Canadians threw us a life line by allowing foreign vessels, for any purpose, to transit their waters, either coastal or inside channels, from one foreign country to another foreign country. The transit must be done in a direct route and expeditious fashion but anchoring or essential stops, for fuel or food, are allowed.

We depart Bainbridge Island the afternoon of July 2 anchoring the first night in Port Townsend Bay. An early start gets us across the Strait of Juan de Fuca, up Haro Strait and to the customs dock at Van Isle Marina before noon. With our clearance number in hand, we continue through Active Pass and up the Strait of Georgia to a bay northwest of Nanaimo for the night.

I2020-07-005xn the anchorage, our paths cross with Rosy & Jim Addington of Sea Venture who are planning a similar quick (or as least as quickly as 6.5 knot boats can be) transit to Alaska. We’ve known Rosy & Jim for several years and had been commiserating electronically with them about this year’s border closure, so finding them was not a surprise. Since our boats are similar in category (slow, long range cruiser), we decide to buddy boat2020-07-001x to Alaska.

From northwest of Nanaimo, the next day, July 4, we position in Gowlland Harbor, a few miles south of Seymour Narrows, halfway up Vancouver Island. The next day (and night and day, again) is a long one. We catch the 0530 slack before the ebb at Seymour, ride the favorable ebb current through Johnstone, pass Port McNeill, enter Gordon Channel, cross Queen Charlotte Sound, enter Laredo Sound a2020-07-007xnd make our way up Principe Channel to McMicking Inlet on Campania Island, a 263 mile and 39 hour journey. From here its one more anchorage in Canada at Kelp Passage, SW of Prince Rupert. The next day, July 8, we cross the border between Canada and the USA, clear US customs via the ROAM app on our phones, and enter Alaska.

2020-07-024xTo prevent the spread of Corona virus, Alaska requires those entering the state to bring a recent negative Covid-19 test, take a test upon entering and stay in quarantine until negative results are returned, or complete a 14-day quarantine.  Since the quarantine clock started at our last port of call in Bainbridge we decide to stay isolated on our boat cruising in Misty Fjords and not arrive in Ketchikan until our quarantine is complete. Jim & Rosy on Sea Venture, had left their last port of call in Anacortes earlier than we had and elect to proceed to Ketchikan more directly, so we split up at this point.

2020-07-033xWith fewer cruising boats we are able to secure the USFS buoys in Punchbowl Cove, Walker Cove and Klu Bay as well as anchor in isolation in Fitzgibbon Cove and Moser Bay, as we make our way slowly up Eastern Behm Canal, across the north side of Revillagigedo Island and then back down Western Behm Canal. Misty Fjord lives up to its name and reputation. We arrive in Ketchikan on Thursday, July 16, having completed the transit to Alaska and satisfied our Covid-19 quarantine period.

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Red Bluff

As we work our way out Pybus Bay, a large group of sea otters are lazily bobbing up and down on the surface. Every year we see the sea otter population increasing in this area. They are very cute but the commercial fishermen despise them. They will eventually wipe out the crab population here as […]

Stornoway Projects

The replacement parts for our failed generator arrived from the US into the UK two days after we reached Stornoway, but got stuck in the UPS system for another eight days. While we waited, we completed some other projects, including finishing off the wax job we’d started at the Isle of Gigha. We also arranged…

We Need More Shampoo

It rained most of the day yesterday. That meant the kids were stuck on the boat. Mom and Dad paid for that transgression last night… Dylan, Dee Dee, and Dora had to get some exercise today. Mom formed a plan. Rather than take two dogs to a potentially muddy dog park, the whole crew took a walk this morning and then Dad took Dora to the park by herself.

Turns out it was a wise decision.

Mom’s pretty smart but she definitely needs more shampoo.

Provisioning in Stornoway

We spent our first few days in Stornoway busily reprovisioning the boat. After six trips to the grocery store, sometimes twice in one day, we still had a few more items to purchase. But our list was down to a half page from three. We also topped up our propane and engine oil supplies, and…

Little Port Walter

After four nights on the hook in Red Bluff Bay, it feels good to be cruising once again. Our weather forecast predicts seas building this afternoon in Chatham Strait so we have an early departure of 6 am. It is a beautiful 30 mile cruise south along the eastern shore of Baranof Island. The snow […]

What Did We Do Wrong Officer?

While anchored in Cannery Cove, we spot a 100 foot boat heading towards the anchorage. We have seen this boat before. It’s The Enforcer, the Alaska State Trooper Boat. They deploy their small skiff and three agents are soon motoring through the harbor. We are the only boat here so are sure they will come […]

Shampoo, Rinse, Repeat

Another morning, another dog park visit, eight more muddy paws.